Centre State Exports - Wheat, Feed Barley, Malt Barley, Canola, Field Peas, Faba Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas, Lupins and Vetch Centre State Exports - Wheat, Feed Barley, Malt Barley, Canola, Field Peas, Faba Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas, Lupins and Vetch Centre State Exportse - Wheat, Feed Barley, Malt Barley, Canola, Field Peas, Faba Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas, Lupins and Vetch

Chick Peas

Kabuli and Desi are the Chickpea types grown in Australia, with Kabuli (including Genesis 090 and Almaz varieties) predominating in South Australia due mainly to variety limitations and disease management.

Kabuli chickpeas, larger and lighter in colour than Desi, are usually sold into size-based markets, where the larger (over 8mm) are used for canning and the smaller for making Dahl (chickpea flour).

Centre State generally sells chickpeas in containers, and receives and packs crops at plants such as Peninsula Seeds, Manoora Seeds and Professional Grain at Two Wells.

Purchases are made on forward or cash contracts in accordance with our terms and conditions , and keeping paperwork concise and understandable is one of the ways that makes Centre State easy to deal with.

A seasoned operator in the Pulse industry, Centre State Exports is an active supporter of the development of Pulse varieties and the advancement of the industry in general. We are active & financial members of Pulse Australia and Pulse South Australia and are regularly involved in grower forums and the development of Pulse standards and markets.

Chickpeas

Chickpeas are high in protein and one of the earliest cultivated crops, 7,500 year old remains having been found in the Middle East. By the Bronze Age, chickpeas were grown in Italy and Greece. In classical Greece, they were called erébinthos and eaten as a staple, a dessert, or consumed raw when young. The Romans knew several varieties such as venus, ram, and punic chickpeas. They were cooked down into a broth or roasted as a snack. The Roman gourmet Apicius gives several recipes for chickpeas. In the first World War with access to coffee beans cut off, the Germans grew chickpeas as a coffee substitute: Ersatz Coffee.