Centre State Exports - Wheat, Feed Barley, Malt Barley, Canola, Field Peas, Faba Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas, Lupins and Vetch Centre State Exports - Wheat, Feed Barley, Malt Barley, Canola, Field Peas, Faba Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas, Lupins and Vetch Centre State Exportse - Wheat, Feed Barley, Malt Barley, Canola, Field Peas, Faba Beans, Lentils, Chickpeas, Lupins and Vetch

Centre State Canola

Centre State Exports is one South Australia’s most significant buyers of Canola and operates in all regions of South Australia. The majority of our Canola is shipped in bulk from Port Lincoln, Port Adelaide and Portland.

Your Canola will go to any one of a number of markets, including China, Europe, Japan and the Indian sub-continent.

Our network of buyers principally services well-established food-product needs but also taps into the growing demand for oilseeds in the production of bio-fuel, notably in Europe. European markets require canola production to come from sustainable sources. For further information about what is required to sell Centre State Exports sustainable canola go to EU Sustainable Canola.

Purchase of your Canola is subject to oil content quality scales and Centre State works within the standards of the Australian Oilseed Federation, which allow flexible contract options ranging from full oil bonus through to nil oil bonus contracts.

As a family-based business that understands growers’ needs, Centre State goes the extra distance to ensure that you reap the best rewards for your Canola crop, whether you are looking for a daily cash price or target price contract. Centre State is a member of GTA and complies with GTA trade rules. All our contracts conform to Centre State’s standard terms and conditions.

Testimonial from a long-term satisfied grower

Mark Crettenden, Yeelanna

Centre State were one the first independent grain trading companies that offered a price for canola on the Eyre Peninsula. Just their presence in the market in the early days of growing canola made a difference by providing competition and they are still doing that for us today.

Canola

For centuries, rapeseed (from the Latin for ‘turnip’) oiled the wheels of civilisation, first as fuel for lamps, later as a cooking oil and food additive and then literally to lubricate the steam engines of the Industrial Revolution. Steam-powered merchant and naval fleets would have ground to a halt without rapeseed oil during World War II.

The forerunner of today’s Canola was developed at the University of Manitoba in the 1960s, using selective breeding to develop a variety of rapeseed low in erucic acid. Another variety was produced in 1974 with low levels of both erucic acid and glucosinolates. From this came the name: CANadian Oil, Low Acid, or Canola for short.

Canola oil is low in saturated fat, high in mono-unsaturated fat and has a beneficial Omega-3 fatty aid profile. It is an essential part of today’s health conscious approach to food.

Canola in Australia*

Australian rapeseed production began in the late 1960s and was severely affected by blackleg in the early 1970s. Breeding programs began in the early 1970s and slowly produced canola quality varieties that had better blackleg resistance and yield. Canola production began to increase in the early 1990s assisted by Canola Check, better varieties and improved agronomy. By the late 1990s, canola had become a major crop in rotations for Australian farmers, with the future advance of additional herbicide resistances likely to see further increases in area sown. (*Source: B. Colton, T. Potter: Canola in Australia: The First Thiry Years (History), The Regional Institute 1999-2006.)